Tag Archive: year of faith


The Holy Father has called upon Catholics to take up praying the Rosary with renewed enthusiasm during the Year of Faith which begins October 11.

He said:

… I would like to invite everyone to cherish the Rosary during the forthcoming Year of Faith. With the Rosary, in fact, we allow ourselves to be guided by Mary, the model of faith, in meditating upon the mysteries of Christ, and day after day we are helped to assimilate the Gospel so that it can shape our lives. Therefore, in the wake of my predecessors, and in particular Blessed John Paul II who ten years ago gave us his Apostolic Letter ‘Rosarium Virginis Mariae’, I invite people to pray the Rosary individually, in the family and in the community, placing themselves in the school of Mary who leads us to Christ, the living centre of our faith”.

— Pope Benedict XVI, before praying the Angelus, Sunday, 7 October 2012.

 

Today is Pentecost Sunday, and with it begins the Year of Grace which has been called by the Australian bishops.  The brochure that was handed out at Masses in Brisbane this weekend says that the Year of Grace is

A holy time, given by God, to start afresh from Christ;  to contemplate his face and listen to God’s Word, that Jesus may heal our wounds, overcome all our divisions, and make us rich in hope, so that we may show forth his face and speak God’s saving Word to the world in new ways.

The local Brisbane Archdiocesan website for the Year of Grace can be found here.  There is also a Facebook group.

The Year of Grace in Australia will overlap with the Year of Faith, an international Year called for by Pope Benedict beginning in October on the anniversary of the opening of the Second Vatican Council, but I don’t think that will matter much as both Years will have a similar goal: renewal of faith in Jesus Christ.

Click here to go to the National Year of Grace Prayer – perhaps you could say it when you make your morning offering, or as part of grace before the evening meal?

In other news … (including the suggestion, or two)

I haven’t had much chance for blogging of late!  I am half-way through my tribunal and chancery practicum, so that keeps me occupied for most of the week.

I did get slightly excited when I saw an announcement in the Archdiocesan Clergy Bulletin announcing that the Archdiocese was going to take up the new social media.  Because I read the notice in a hurry I assumed that meant Facebook.   However, when I read the notice more carefully later, it seems we haven’t gone that far yet.  But, for those of you who use Twitter, who can follow the Archdiocese of Brisbane at https://twitter.com/BneArchdiocese  Hopefully the Archdiocese might join the rest of us on Facebook soon!

But it did get me thinking … what would be really excellent, in my humble opinion, is if Archbishop Coleridge took up blogging!   Since he is already showing himself to be a very “hands on” leader, a blog would give all of us direct and constant contact with his thoughts and activities.

The excellent Archbishop of Ottawa, Terrence Prendergast SJ, maintains a very informative blog (The Journey of a Bishop) complete with pictures detailing his many pastoral and other engagements in the Archdiocese of Ottawa, in Canada, and internationally.  I’m not sure how he finds the time to do it, but he is certainly setting a good example of what is possible.

The Holy Father is recommending us to study the Catechism of the Catholic Church, especially during the Year of Faith, and as a fundamental text for the work of the new evangelization. Here’s a resource to help you delve into the Catechism. If you don’t have a copy, go to http://www.vatican.va and click on “Resource Library” on the main page.

Dominus Mihi Adjutor

One of the tragically under-utilized resources of the Church is the Catechism of the Catholic Church. It is a rich, readable, and reliable compendium of the teaching of the Church on pretty much everything. Most people, myself included, usually use it ad hoc, dipping in as need requires. But this is to miss the structure that makes the whole book cohere and logically flow.

However, why don’t we read it, cover to cover? Some clever boys have decided to help us do that. They have started a website from which you can download each day week (!) a podcast/audio file (or just use it online) which will cover a number of paragraphs of the Catechism each day. All you have to do is listen, or grab your copy of the Catechism and follow along as it is read out to you. If you do not have a copy…

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